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Tagged: Personal characteristics

Deep dive: show schools and colleges who you really are

January 7th, 2020

When applying to boarding school or college, you work to distill your entire life into a several-page application for someone to read and determine your fate. What do you include? How do you stand out against the other piles of applications?

Photo by Getty via Forbes

Sure, you include test scores, GPA, involvement in clubs and other extracurricular activities. But what really makes you, you? What do you do on a day to day basis that doesn’t necessarily “earn points” with the admission office but shows what you really value as a person? In the article linked below from Forbes contributor Brennan Barnard, you’ll learn how to take a deep dive into your daily tasks and discover exactly how to reveal what’s at your core to admission officers.

Seniors sending updates to admission offices may glean some ideas, and juniors looking ahead to next year’s applications can certainly benefit from Barnard’s article. Boarding school applicants, too, may find this article helpfulful as they put final touches on pending applications.

Article referenced below from Forbes, published November 20, 2019 written by Brennan Barnard

What Matters In College Admission

A look of surprise and encouragement washes over his face and with earnest he exclaims, “You mean that matters?”

I am sitting in my school counseling office reviewing a high school senior’s college application, and I have asked why there is no mention of the hours he spends at home after school caring for his grandfather.

Read more at Forbes>>

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Thanksgiving break: time for relaxation and thoughtful work

November 26th, 2019

Fall semester can be grueling! Between standardized tests, schoolwork, extracurricular commitments and college applications, many high school students feel over-worked, fatigued and quite frankly burnt out. High school doesn’t have to feel like an impossible juggling act. It is important to take time for yourself and this coming winter break will be a great time to do so.

Before winter break arrives, though, Thanksgiving break allows a few days off of school. You’ll have time to check some things off of your to-do list (remaining college applications, anyone?), spend time with family and get some much needed rest and relaxation. And let’s not forget feasting and gratitude!

The article we’re sharing below is a great read on how to avoid high school burnout. If you feel overwhelmed, this may help you come up with a “workable routine” and get yourself back on track.

Article referenced below from Kivo Daily, published September 24, 2018 written by Winnie Custodio

What is burnout? Although you won’t see smoke coming out from your ears, it may feel like so. Students, with a barrage of things to do at home and in school, may experience this. Burnout is actually a psychological term. It refers to a condition of physical, mental and emotional exhaustion because of prolonged stress. Along with burnout are other symptoms such as frustration and low self-esteem. One feels lethargic and dissociated from all of their activities. Burnout happens to most people at some points, at varying degrees.

What Are The Symptoms of A Burnout?

What do you tend to do if you’re burnt out? Is there ever a time when you simply feel like sitting on the couch and watch Netflix for hours? Or get stuck in your computer dawdling on social media? Instead of working or studying, you decide to clean your closet instead. These are signs that you’re burning out. What are the other symptoms of this condition?

Read more at Kivo Daily>>

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Deepen your impact this school year

August 20th, 2019

Now that school is in full swing for much of the midwest, college application season is right around the corner. When applying to college, students always want to know how they can “stand out” and differentiate themselves from other applicants. A great way to do that is by not only performing well academically but also making an impact in your school and/or community.

Colleges want to know how you will make your mark in and out of the classroom. In order to determine this answer, it is important to look deep inside yourself. What are your interests? What are your passions? What are your talents? Colleges want to see that you’ve devoted time and energy to an activity or project that you are fully committed to, and that you’re working to bring about positive change. The article shared below from Forbes.com provides great content on this topic. Invest yourself fully in all that you do, and you’ll be successful in your everyday life and in the college application world.

Article linked below from Forbes.com, published September 12, 2015 by Chris Teare

Colleges Ask: What’s Your Impact?

Last month I posted How Colleges Judge Your High School Courseload, prompted by an encounter with a prospective student at Drew University. The first document in every application is indeed the transcript: What courses has a student selected; how has he or she performed? The second document that can be a deal-maker or –breaker is the resume, one which takes a different form in the context of the Common Application. The first question college admissions officers ask is, “Can and will this student do our academic work and go on to graduate?” The second is, “What impact will this student have outside the classroom?” If you want to be successful in the college process, you need a good answer to both questions.

The best way to build a record that will result in a compelling resume is to pursue your interest—or interests—as fully and passionately as you can. I consciously wrote a singular at first, because you may be zealously devoted to only one thing. If so, be great at it, and your accomplishment may be enough. I worked with a young man who is now a junior at Yale whose only significant extracurricular commitment was—and is—sailing; however, as a Youth Olympics Gold Medalist, that one thing, based upon great talent and untold hours on the water, made him someone every college coach in the nation wanted to recruit. He can, and has, done the academic work, and he can make a sailboat go faster than anyone else. He wins.

Read more at Forbes.com>>

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Start the school year with GREAT habits

August 6th, 2019

For many students in our area, school will begin in just a matter of days. The beginning of school is a great time to hit the reset button and have a fresh start. With enough organization, determination and preparation, this year will be the best one yet!

Do you want to know how successful students are making it happen? In the article we share below, 8 Habits of Highly Successful Students, having healthy habits inside and outside of the classroom is key. This particular article, although written for college students, is applicable to each and every one of us as we strive to keep a balanced life while setting goals for the future.

Article linked below from College Info Geek, published August 14, 2017 by Thomas Frank

We have talked a lot about how to do well academically here at CIG.  That includes:

But of course, successful students don’t just do well academically; they usually do well all around.

So, the question is:

What separates truly successful students who have it together and do well in all areas of their lives, from the ones who just do well on the academic side of things?

This question could be answered many ways, but one clear answer is that successful students cultivate habits that set them up for success.

Read more at College Info Geek>>

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