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The importance of a testing timeline

December 10th, 2019

As the semester is winding down and winter break is upon us, it is a great time to begin planning ahead for your next step in the college admissions process. Juniors will soon receive PSAT results, which means it’s time to determine a strategic plan for spring semester SAT and/or ACT testing.

Image via FastWeb

Have you mapped out your strategic testing plan for the months ahead? How will you juggle test preparation with studying and extracurricular commitments? The article linked below from Applerouth offers great food for thought about all of this.

(Note: Although Shropshire Educational Consulting is not affiliated with Applerouth, we trust their website and appreciate all that this test prep organization shares.)

Article referenced below from Applerouth, published February 13, 2019 written by Katie Rose-De Laet

Creating Your Student’s Best College Admissions Testing Timeline: How to Get Started

Spring is a time of rebirth and renewal. Springtime is when we really feel the need to plan out the future. It’s a great time to start making academic and test prep plans as well: you’re almost done with one academic year, but not yet bogged down in summer vacations and internships and part-time jobs. Many parents aren’t sure exactly where to start when it comes to planning out their student’s testing timeline – so we’re going to walk you through the process, starting at the end and working backwards!

If you don’t yet have a college testing timeline worked out for your student, this is the time to do it. If your student is a freshman or younger, it’s too early to begin any kind of test prep, but it’s never too early to work out a timeline. Planning ahead will make sure you don’t miss out on any deadlines, but it will also take a load off your mind and allow you and your student to focus on what’s most important, no matter where they are in their school career.

Read more at Applerouth>>

Thanksgiving break: time for relaxation and thoughtful work

November 26th, 2019

Fall semester can be grueling! Between standardized tests, schoolwork, extracurricular commitments and college applications, many high school students feel over-worked, fatigued and quite frankly burnt out. High school doesn’t have to feel like an impossible juggling act. It is important to take time for yourself and this coming winter break will be a great time to do so.

Before winter break arrives, though, Thanksgiving break allows a few days off of school. You’ll have time to check some things off of your to-do list (remaining college applications, anyone?), spend time with family and get some much needed rest and relaxation. And let’s not forget feasting and gratitude!

The article we’re sharing below is a great read on how to avoid high school burnout. If you feel overwhelmed, this may help you come up with a “workable routine” and get yourself back on track.

Article referenced below from Kivo Daily, published September 24, 2018 written by Winnie Custodio

What is burnout? Although you won’t see smoke coming out from your ears, it may feel like so. Students, with a barrage of things to do at home and in school, may experience this. Burnout is actually a psychological term. It refers to a condition of physical, mental and emotional exhaustion because of prolonged stress. Along with burnout are other symptoms such as frustration and low self-esteem. One feels lethargic and dissociated from all of their activities. Burnout happens to most people at some points, at varying degrees.

What Are The Symptoms of A Burnout?

What do you tend to do if you’re burnt out? Is there ever a time when you simply feel like sitting on the couch and watch Netflix for hours? Or get stuck in your computer dawdling on social media? Instead of working or studying, you decide to clean your closet instead. These are signs that you’re burning out. What are the other symptoms of this condition?

Read more at Kivo Daily>>

On the road to independence

November 12th, 2019

The first round of Early Action and Early Decision deadlines has passed. And now, on to the next round of deadlines (some coming up quite soon) while trying to stay afloat during your busiest semester yet! Each step that you complete makes you more self-reliant and independent. Even taking ownership of small tasks, like contacting an admission office to have a question resolved, helps you build confidence to tackle bigger challenges. Each accomplishment, whether large or small, is strengthening you for the next phase of life. That’s worth celebrating!

Photo by Alamy via New York Times

Empowering teenagers to take initiative in shaping their future is crucial to their growth, and completing applications is just the beginning. The article referenced below from The New York Times details the challenges inherent in this journey and how the overall experience creates the kind of “growth parents dream of.”

Article referenced below from The New York Times, published October 22, 2019 written by Kelly Corrigan

After a College Applicant Hits ‘Send’

In the early days of last fall, my daughter was projecting confidence about the college application process. She’d make a spreadsheet, things would be checked off, it’ll all come together, Mom. But right around this point, with classes and sports in full swing, college mutated from something exciting to that-which-shall-not-be-named. To inquire about, say, a 150-word supplemental essay was to provoke a fit of unholy madness.

It was probably no coincidence that her mood crashed just before the Nov. 1 early application deadline, as I bet it is doing in a couple million households across the country right this minute.

What I couldn’t have known then is this: Something beautiful is being formed in the dumpster fire that is senior fall. Regardless of outcome, the college application process itself can force the kind of growth parents dream of. Here’s why:

Read more at The New York Times>>

The power of a liberal arts degree in the workforce

October 29th, 2019

In today’s workforce there is a lot of emphasis on STEM degrees, which can be intimidating and discouraging for liberal arts college students. While tech skills are increasingly important as more jobs are created by escalating advances in technology, the foundational skills provided by a liberal arts degree are a major asset in the workplace.

Image by Cornelia Li via New York Times

Critical thinking, problem-solving and the ability to collaborate with different viewpoints are key skills that create strong employees and leaders. These “soft skills” learned through a liberal arts education prepare students to work in a wide variety of settings. In the article referenced below from The New York Times, statistics are given to show that liberal arts degrees are often winning the “salary race” in the long run due to the broad intellectual training this degree provides.

Article referenced below from The New York Times, published September 20, 2019 written by David Deming

In the Salary Race, Engineers Sprint but English Majors Endure

For students chasing lasting wealth, the best choice of a college major is less obvious than you might think.

The conventional wisdom is that computer science and engineering majors have better employment prospects and higher earnings than their peers who choose liberal arts.

This is true for the first job, but the long-term story is more complicated.

The advantage for STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) majors fades steadily after their first jobs, and by age 40 the earnings of people who majored in fields like social science or history have caught up.

To read more go to New York Times>>