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Tagged: Admission decision

Social media is fair game

April 30th, 2018

In this digital age we live in, many high school students document much of their lives through social media.  And with increasing competition amongst college applicants, many admissions officers are using social media as an additional tool for screening candidates.  This approach is a fast, easy and anonymous way to gain insight into students’ lives.  But will it weigh in your favor?

Keep in mind that your social media presence can add value to your application; it could be used as a way to highlight talents and experiences and leave a positive impression.  If you’re not careful, though, it could have the opposite effect.

While admissions officers are continuing to place greatest emphasis on traditional components of the application such as transcript, test scores and extracurricular accomplishments, there is a chance that they may look to your social media accounts as another means of evaluation.  This trend has increased over the past several years and will probably continue to move in that direction.  

In the article we share with you today from Kaplan Test Prep, you can learn more about why many admissions officers are choosing this form of assessment.

Article referenced below from Kaplan Test Prep

Published on April 17, 2018

More than two-thirds of colleges (68 percent) say that it’s “fair game” for them to visit applicants’ social media profiles like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to help them decide who gets in — despite the fact that less than a third actually engage in the practice, according to Kaplan Test Prep’s annual survey of admissions officers*. Notably, students agree: a separate Kaplan survey of over 900 high school students finds that 70 percent consider social media profiles “fair game” for admissions officers evaluating applicants — an increase from 58 percent in 2014**.

Read more at Kaplan Test Prep >>

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Admitted, denied or waitlisted

April 2nd, 2018

Did you hear a giant exhale last week?  The waiting game is over as most seniors received their remaining admission decisions; we’ve loved hearing from students about results.  Readers may be surprised to know that nearly all seniors saw each of these three words:  admitted, denied and wait-listed.  And that is as it should be.

The green light, yellow light, red light and lottery admission estimate system we have in place at Shrop Ed helps instill confidence that there will be good news as those decisions roll in.  As the number of applicants continues to rise, the number of rejections from colleges and universities increases as well.  This puts an extreme amount of pressure on students, and we hope that younger students and their parents understand the importance of creating an application list that includes plenty of green and yellow light options that feel like a fit.  Our seniors vouch for it.

Back to those three big words – here is some advice pertaining to each:

Admitted

Congratulations!  You can finally take a deep breath and enjoy the moment.  You now have until May 1st to notify the college of your choice that you will enroll.  Explore carefully between now and then to make sure you’re fully comfortable with your decision. 

Did you know that every admission offer is contingent on continued success?  Be certain to maintain your efforts in school, finishing strongly.  This not only insures a smooth transition to college in the fall, but keeps you on the right side of your admission offer.

Wait-listed

If this college remains your top choice, accept the offer and make clear that you are still interested by doing more.  Update your file, if the college allows, with your most recent grades, latest test scores (if not already on record), new accomplishments and distinctions, etc.  Remain proactive, reaching out to your admission counselor and demonstrating authentic interest.  If you would definitely enroll if admitted, state this unequivocally.

Denied

This is hard news to swallow, but it is a competitive world and the admission landscape has grown more challenging with each passing year.  Keep your head up and focus on the schools you were admitted to.  You are the same person today as you were before receiving the news; your strengths and potential to succeed are fully intact.

Not being accepted is difficult to handle, especially after putting your heart and soul into the college application process.    In the article we share with you today, writer Deirdre Fernandes from the Boston Globe digs a little deeper into the reality of disappointments surrounding U.S. colleges and universities.  

Article referenced below from Boston Globe

Published March 27, 2018

You’ve seen the viral videos: high school seniors leaping around the room, overjoyed at discovering that their top-choice college has welcomed them into the ranks of the incoming freshman class.

But for every victorious online posting, there are multiple high school seniors simultaneously being rejected from those very same schools.

Getting into the country’s most selective colleges is more fiercely competitive than ever, with many schools reporting a record number of applicants, boosted by an easier application process and more aggressive recruiting. Twenty years ago, for example, Tufts University admitted 33 percent of the students who applied; last year Tufts made offers to just 15 percent of the pool. Northeastern University extended offers to nearly four out of five applicants in 1998, but only one out of five this year. Williams College’s admissions rate has shrunk from 26 percent to 12 percent over two decades.

Read more at Boston Globe >>

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What does your high school transcript say about you?

March 19th, 2018

What does your high school transcript say about you?  This is a great question to ask yourself when selecting courses for next year.  My years on admission committees taught me that the high school transcript is the most influential component you will submit while applying to college.  So how can you choose classes that will give you the best possible foundation for college level work and improve your chances of admission?  Yale University has the answer.  

The article linked below is a great tool when considering class selection and the advice given is truly beneficial for students of all levels and accomplishments. While many of you have already completed your preliminary course selection there might still be opportunities to make changes.  As always, if you have any questions throughout the process, please contact me.  

Article below referenced from Yale University 

Many high school sophomores and juniors (and their parents) want to know what courses to take to improve their chances for admission to Yale and other highly competitive colleges. With the caveat that every situation is different, here is some advice to help guide you as you make these decisions.

A Holistic Approach to Admissions

The high school transcript is almost always the most important document in a student’s application. But it is hard to conceive of a situation in which the appearance (or absence) of any one particular class on a transcript would determine the applicant’s outcome. The admissions committee does not make its decisions based on a piecemeal review of an applicant’s recommendations, test scores, activities, or individual elements of a high school transcript. It considers each application as a comprehensive picture of that student.

Read more at Yale University >>

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Next steps for any college admission decision

March 27th, 2017

Last week many students received their final admission decision letters.  For some students, the waiting continues … just a few more days.  We’ve been delighted to share in much excitement, some disappointment and, in some cases, questions as to what your next steps should be.  Thanks to last week’s post from The Georgia Tech Blog,  we all know that during this time we need to “be cool,” but what more, specifically, can you do before making your final enrollment choice?

The article link below offers guidelines to help you contemplate next steps, whether you have been accepted, wait-listed or denied.  As always, we are very proud of all our hard-working seniors and we are here to answer any questions you might have during these final weeks of the application process.

Article published below by The Princeton Review 

The college decision letters and emails are rolling in. Celebrate your acceptances, stay positive, and strategize with your college counselor about what you’ll do next. Whatever your application status, we have some tips on planning your next move.

If You’re Accepted

If you applied regular decision, you have until May 1 (“Decision Day”) to notify colleges. Here’s what you should do after you receive your college acceptance letters:

Read more at The Princeton Review >>

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