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A summer job or internship can change your life

June 25th, 2019

Summer break lends the perfect opportunity to gain real world experience through an internship or summer job.  Teenagers who take on this responsibility can foster skills in organization, time management, and self-confidence.  And sometimes these opportunities can lead to a better understanding of their field of interest.  

In today’s blog post we share an article written for graduate students working on summer internships.  Why? 

Believe it or not, it’s equally relevant to high school and college students.  The most important thing you can do this summer is make the most of your time.  Use each opportunity as a learning experience whether it’s an internship, or paid or volunteer work.  This will lead to a proactive approach and can help you not only determine your future goals … but reach them!

Article linked below from Inside HigherEd, published June 12, 2019 by Andrew Bishop

For many grad students, summer is a chance to leave the classroom and have a new experience outside of the university environment. Some programs (like mine) require students to participate in a summer internship within their respective disciplines so that they can practice newly acquired skills, explore potential career paths, and build their resume. Internships can provide you with a new lens through which you can contextualize your work and see where you fit in the broader field. 

The problem with internships is that they can often be hit-or-miss. While some organizations have a robust program that allows interns to dive into engaging projects and receive mentorship, others are ill-equipped and barely have enough work to fill one’s time. As an undergraduate, I had internships across this spectrum. I remember the excitement of digging into research on education policy that came with one internship, but also the boredom that came with another.

Read more at Inside HigherEd>>

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Kindness: one key to success for college admission

May 14th, 2019

Earlier this month, I toured several boarding schools on the east coast. The visits were great and I was particularly struck by the last school visited, where students displayed an uncommon degree of kindness and compassion.  This was manifested in part by their warm descriptions of not only teachers, but staff members performing important but less prestigious work on campus.  Students’ smiles were huge as they described these individuals’ roles in their lives and I left wondering why that isn’t the norm.

The admissions scandals are bringing up important conversations among parents, teachers and students. How can we improve the system so that we are considering the best fit for each individual instead of ignoring core values just to get into the most selective schools?

My trip sparked ideas about character development and made me think about the second “Turning the Tide” report released earlier this spring. Turning the Tide stems from the Making Caring Common campaign based at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, focusing on character building in schools, at home, and during the admissions process. It is a great read for people of all ages and I hope it provokes thought about which values are really important to become a good citizen, which in turn will lead you on the right path through the college admissions process … and through life.

Article linked below from Making Caring Common Project, published in March 2019

Our new report calls on parents and high schools to put young people’s character and well-being at the center of a healthier, more sane college admissions process.

Three years in the making, Turning the Tide II: How Parents and High Schools Can Cultivate Ethical Character and Reduce Distress in The College Admissions Process, offers guidelines for high schools and parents in promoting ethical character. It also describes how Tsome high schools and colleges are working to promote greater ethical engagement among high school students, level the playing field for economically disadvantaged students, and reduce excessive achievement pressure. The report also includes a pioneering statement from admissions deans seeking to advance Turning the Tide’s goals.

Read more at Making Caring Common Project>>

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Make the most of your summer

February 5th, 2019

The recent warm-up after a bitter cold spell has me thinking that now is the perfect time for students to think about summer plans! 

The long break from school provides a perfect opportunity to explore your interests more thoroughly.  Nothing matters more than a student’s growth during the high school years and by making great choices with curriculum, extracurricular activities and summer engagement, you can become a stronger and more compelling individual.  A great bonus:  you’ll also become a stronger and more compelling college applicant.  

I want to share an article from The Princeton Review titled, 14 Summer Activities to Boost Your College Application.  Now, while I can’t promise that each of the items listed will “boost” your college application, I do know that having fun while also working on self-growth is a win-win.  

Article referenced below from The Princeton Review

Did you know summer activities can push your college application to the “yes” pile?

Colleges want to see that you are committed to extracurriculars throughout the school year, but they also love it when you are making the effort to expand and stretch yourself over summer vacation. What you do with your time can help you stand out from other applicants who have similar test scores and GPAs.

high school summer

What Should High Schoolers Do Over the Summer?

Your summer vacation is the perfect time for college prep and to explore potential careers. All summers in high school are important, especially the summers after sophomore and junior year. Check out these summer activity ideas that are fun, creative, and will make admissions officers take notice.

Read more at Princeton Review >>

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Meet a new generation of doers

August 21st, 2018

In today’s world, more and more youth use the power of their voice to make a difference and we are always happy to see these outstanding young people highlighted in the media.  One way local Kentucky students are sharing their collective voice is through the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence’s Student Voice Team.  This organization gives students the opportunity to make a difference in Kentucky schools across the Commonwealth.  And are they ever making an impact!

One small idea can have a huge impact as long as hard work and ambition go along with it.  In today’s article from Family Circle we share 5 amazing teens who are making a difference in the lives of people around them.  We hope this article inspires each of you to believe in your ideas and use your talents to make an impact in this world.   

Article referenced below from Family Circle

Published by John Hanc

“Ready, set, pitch!” Seventy high school and college students come to life in a conference room at New York University. Facing them in an outer ring of chairs are adults—a cross-section of government officials, foundation board members and other deep-pocketed notables from the worlds of social service and philanthropy. They will soon vote and award three students $1,000 each to fund their projects.

This is “Speed Pitch,” the culmination of DoSomething.org’s Social Action Boot Camp, which aims to inspire, empower and celebrate young people who are passionate about community service. Throughout the daylong conference, students have shared and sharpened their ideas of social reform; this is their final opportunity to present them to people of power. Each teen came with a plan for a nonprofit project, like creating a cheerleading squad for special-needs students or crafting homemade gifts for children in local hospitals. As the students deliver their two-minute speeches, the experts listen and offer advice. When a facilitator calls, “Time’s up!” the teens move one seat over and start the pitching process again. Think of it as speed dating for social causes.

 

Read more at Family Circle >>

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