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Tagged: High school

The psychology behind senioritis

April 16th, 2018

Not many weeks remain before the end of school and graduation for the class of 2018.  Yet while we may be thinking happily of all things summer, senioritis may be rearing its ugly head.  Shrop Ed seniors, don’t let it happen to you!  There are many reasons to remain focused through the remainder of the school year.

Students who maintain their work ethic transition easily to college expectations.  For those who slack off, college-level work feels like an enormous leap.  And don’t forget that contingency clause in the admission letter:  every offer of admission is contingent on continued success.  

It may seem impossible to stay focused while envisioning the amazing future that lies ahead, but remember that you have been working hard throughout your entire high school career to get to this point.  Challenge yourself to finish with a flourish.

So what is senioritis and why does it impact so many?  In the article linked below, University of Notre Dame psychology professor Darcia Narvaez discusses the psychology behind senioritis.  Surprisingly, it doesn’t only affect senior students.  It can happen to anyone going through a major transition in life.  We think students and parents alike will find today’s article interesting.

Article referenced below from Boston’s NPR news station, WBUR

Published May 27, 2017

The affliction known as senioritis isn’t just about slacking off — and it isn’t just for high schoolers ready to head off to college.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with University of Notre Dame psychology professor Darcia Narvaez about what causes us to slack off as a major life project is ending, and how we can handle it better.

Read more at WBUR >>

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What does your high school transcript say about you?

March 19th, 2018

What does your high school transcript say about you?  This is a great question to ask yourself when selecting courses for next year.  My years on admission committees taught me that the high school transcript is the most influential component you will submit while applying to college.  So how can you choose classes that will give you the best possible foundation for college level work and improve your chances of admission?  Yale University has the answer.  

The article linked below is a great tool when considering class selection and the advice given is truly beneficial for students of all levels and accomplishments. While many of you have already completed your preliminary course selection there might still be opportunities to make changes.  As always, if you have any questions throughout the process, please contact me.  

Article below referenced from Yale University 

Many high school sophomores and juniors (and their parents) want to know what courses to take to improve their chances for admission to Yale and other highly competitive colleges. With the caveat that every situation is different, here is some advice to help guide you as you make these decisions.

A Holistic Approach to Admissions

The high school transcript is almost always the most important document in a student’s application. But it is hard to conceive of a situation in which the appearance (or absence) of any one particular class on a transcript would determine the applicant’s outcome. The admissions committee does not make its decisions based on a piecemeal review of an applicant’s recommendations, test scores, activities, or individual elements of a high school transcript. It considers each application as a comprehensive picture of that student.

Read more at Yale University >>

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Summer Plans

February 19th, 2018

The recent glimpse of springlike air coming into Kentucky has me daydreaming of warm summer days.  Summer is a great opportunity for students to take a break from their regularly scheduled academic activities and focus on developing themselves in other areas, or go deeper in an area of significant interest.  

Gaining experience through volunteer work, internships, travel, research and just taking time to read for pleasure are all important ways to reflect on who you are and begin to discover your purpose.  Of course, a little down time is important, too!

Many of our students already have their summer plans well under way.  My hope is that today’s article link from the College Board will help you brainstorm more ideas for summer activities that foster personal growth and development.  Making constructive use of much of your time in the summer should be your top consideration, and you’ll find myriad ways to do so.  

You can change the world.  Let your summer experiences help you build your capacity to do so.

Article below referenced from College Board

Summer break is a perfect opportunity for your students to gain experience through paid or volunteer jobs, internships and other summer activities — pursuits that can also demonstrate a student’s sense of responsibility to college admission officers. How can you help your students choose the most rewarding summer activities?

First, encourage students to talk to adults in their lives who can help them find activities that match their interests.

Read more at College Board >>

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A new year, a new you

January 8th, 2018

The new year is a time to start over for many people, which makes January the perfect opportunity to make productive changes in your life.  Gym memberships are at an all time high right now and many people use the new year to adjust eating habits and kick their workouts into high gear.  Aside from that aspect of getting fit, I am here to offer you some resolutions that will whip this academic year into shape!

The article we link you to today is written for college students, but applies to high school and boarding school students as well.  Writer Kelci Lynn Lucier’s ideas are inspiring and achievable, which makes this piece especially useful to all.  Here is to making 2018 your best academic year yet!

Published December 17, 2017

Written by:  Kelci Lynn Lucier (for Thoughtco.com)

While New Year’s Eve often brings a party, the new year itself often brings great hopes for change and growth. If you’re a college student, the new year presents the perfect time to set some resolutions that can help make your academic year more positive, productive, and enjoyable.

Good New Year’s resolutions, of course, are not just those that address the things in your life you’d like to change or improve upon; they also are realistic enough that you’re more likely than not to stick with them.

Read more at ThoughtCo >>

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