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The psychology behind senioritis

April 16th, 2018

Not many weeks remain before the end of school and graduation for the class of 2018.  Yet while we may be thinking happily of all things summer, senioritis may be rearing its ugly head.  Shrop Ed seniors, don’t let it happen to you!  There are many reasons to remain focused through the remainder of the school year.

Students who maintain their work ethic transition easily to college expectations.  For those who slack off, college-level work feels like an enormous leap.  And don’t forget that contingency clause in the admission letter:  every offer of admission is contingent on continued success.  

It may seem impossible to stay focused while envisioning the amazing future that lies ahead, but remember that you have been working hard throughout your entire high school career to get to this point.  Challenge yourself to finish with a flourish.

So what is senioritis and why does it impact so many?  In the article linked below, University of Notre Dame psychology professor Darcia Narvaez discusses the psychology behind senioritis.  Surprisingly, it doesn’t only affect senior students.  It can happen to anyone going through a major transition in life.  We think students and parents alike will find today’s article interesting.

Article referenced below from Boston’s NPR news station, WBUR

Published May 27, 2017

The affliction known as senioritis isn’t just about slacking off — and it isn’t just for high schoolers ready to head off to college.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with University of Notre Dame psychology professor Darcia Narvaez about what causes us to slack off as a major life project is ending, and how we can handle it better.

Read more at WBUR >>

Admitted, denied or waitlisted

April 2nd, 2018

Did you hear a giant exhale last week?  The waiting game is over as most seniors received their remaining admission decisions; we’ve loved hearing from students about results.  Readers may be surprised to know that nearly all seniors saw each of these three words:  admitted, denied and wait-listed.  And that is as it should be.

The green light, yellow light, red light and lottery admission estimate system we have in place at Shrop Ed helps instill confidence that there will be good news as those decisions roll in.  As the number of applicants continues to rise, the number of rejections from colleges and universities increases as well.  This puts an extreme amount of pressure on students, and we hope that younger students and their parents understand the importance of creating an application list that includes plenty of green and yellow light options that feel like a fit.  Our seniors vouch for it.

Back to those three big words – here is some advice pertaining to each:

Admitted

Congratulations!  You can finally take a deep breath and enjoy the moment.  You now have until May 1st to notify the college of your choice that you will enroll.  Explore carefully between now and then to make sure you’re fully comfortable with your decision. 

Did you know that every admission offer is contingent on continued success?  Be certain to maintain your efforts in school, finishing strongly.  This not only insures a smooth transition to college in the fall, but keeps you on the right side of your admission offer.

Wait-listed

If this college remains your top choice, accept the offer and make clear that you are still interested by doing more.  Update your file, if the college allows, with your most recent grades, latest test scores (if not already on record), new accomplishments and distinctions, etc.  Remain proactive, reaching out to your admission counselor and demonstrating authentic interest.  If you would definitely enroll if admitted, state this unequivocally.

Denied

This is hard news to swallow, but it is a competitive world and the admission landscape has grown more challenging with each passing year.  Keep your head up and focus on the schools you were admitted to.  You are the same person today as you were before receiving the news; your strengths and potential to succeed are fully intact.

Not being accepted is difficult to handle, especially after putting your heart and soul into the college application process.    In the article we share with you today, writer Deirdre Fernandes from the Boston Globe digs a little deeper into the reality of disappointments surrounding U.S. colleges and universities.  

Article referenced below from Boston Globe

Published March 27, 2018

You’ve seen the viral videos: high school seniors leaping around the room, overjoyed at discovering that their top-choice college has welcomed them into the ranks of the incoming freshman class.

But for every victorious online posting, there are multiple high school seniors simultaneously being rejected from those very same schools.

Getting into the country’s most selective colleges is more fiercely competitive than ever, with many schools reporting a record number of applicants, boosted by an easier application process and more aggressive recruiting. Twenty years ago, for example, Tufts University admitted 33 percent of the students who applied; last year Tufts made offers to just 15 percent of the pool. Northeastern University extended offers to nearly four out of five applicants in 1998, but only one out of five this year. Williams College’s admissions rate has shrunk from 26 percent to 12 percent over two decades.

Read more at Boston Globe >>

Be organized. Try new things. Get involved. Rise to the challenge. Experience diversity.

March 26th, 2018
Last year’s Shrop Ed seniors continue to send feedback about their first year at college, and today we share excerpts from three students who report both happiness and success.  You’ll note some boldfaced text – these are points that we feel are crucial for younger students to zero in on, to understand what it takes to transition successfully to college.
What themes do you note?
First year at U. of Kentucky
My first few months at the University of Kentucky have been pretty good!  I am currently involved in a variety of activities here, including the International Student Council, the University of Kentucky Leadership Exchange, the Chinese Culture Club, and the Korean Language and Culture Club.  Overall, transitioning to life in campus was not very difficult for me, surprisingly.  My classes have gone quite well so far, and while I am still trying to find my perfect niche here I have met a variety of people I have become close friends with.  Interesting, adjusting to my new homework load wasn’t very difficult, and I finished the semester with straight A’s.  The hardest thing I’ve had to grow used to is managing when I will do all of my homework, but it did not take long for me to get used to this.  I have been working with the Modern and Classical Languages Department to start a new Korean language program due both to strong student interest and my own time spent in South Korea on a scholarship last summer, and I have recently been accepted for a summer internship overseas!  While at times I do wish I had been able to attend one of the other wonderful schools I was accepted to, I do think I have done well at UK so far and I have high hopes for the upcoming semester.
First year at Northeastern U. in Boston
My first semester is going absolutely amazing.  Northeastern was definitely a perfect fit for me and I am so glad I chose it.  The courses I’m taking are really challenging, not sure if I will end up sticking with Math as a major, I may be switching to a minor.  However, I am really enjoying the courses I’m taking and I’m glad Northeastern has given me room in my schedule to explore other areas, such as Communications, Linguistics, and Psychology.  Through the academic part is definitely at challenge, I’ve gained some really great study skills and I’ve become more organized.  My work ethic has increased as well, due to the fact that what I am learning is really interesting and exciting for me!  I think the transition to college went really smoothly and I made friends quickly without any difficulty.  Additionally, I am getting involved on and off campus with different clubs and activities.  I am doing lots of community service for different organizations around Boston and joined a recreational soccer team as well as other activities.  It seems as though I have unlimited opportunities to get involved in clubs/extracurriculars as well as research and internships.  I’m so excited for what is to come in my college career and I can’t thank you enough for all the help in my college process!
First year at Southern Methodist U. Honors Program 
SMU…is academically challenging, especially for me who is in the Honors Program and seeking a triple major (thanks to the AP classes I have taken and my interests in humanities and STEM).  One of the things that has definitely helped me to get through is motivation because I am the kind of person who does not like to do assignments, especially papers for English major classes, the day before it’s due….I would rather work hard on Friday and Saturday so that I can have Sunday free.  What I actually do, providing that there is a long-term assignment, is to put it in my planner twice or even more times and aim for the first date to compete it…
…I have made much effort and found great venues to get involved.  One of the great things I am involved in is Yearbook as a staff writer, which allows and motivates me to go to different events and write about them.  I feel that it is important to do what I actually like while it is also worthwhile to consider the potential benefits.  I am also working for the library, and that’s why I stayed on campus through this winter break.  At the same time, I am applying to become an RA, a position that can potentially bring me more into the community of my Residential Commons.  What has gone smoothly for me is to adapt to the college campus and be independent responsibly because I came to the States when I was 15, and I feel like moving into college is not like leaving my family for the first time.  Therefore, the transition is smooth, and most importantly, since such independence is not something new to me, I treat it with responsibility which is important, in my opinion, for a college freshman.  And what’s surprising is how busy college life can be even if it may sound plausible that I come back to dorm and take a nap after classes.  Classes, homework, jobs/activities, and all other things that will come up take up much of the time, and in order to stick to my routines, I have to pace myself well.
Throughout these months, I have come to understand how the sense of responsibility can play a key role in almost everything, and I have seen how different everyone is.  I went to a very small high school, and college is giving me a better idea of diversity by which I mean how everyone is pursuing different things and how drastically different ideas, personalities, and values can come together….
 ***
We’re grateful to these students for allowing us to share their thoughts with you on our blog, and wish them continued success and new adventures!  We hope they’ll stay in touch with us for a long time to come, just as we hope you will do when you’re at the school of your choice.
 

What does your high school transcript say about you?

March 19th, 2018

What does your high school transcript say about you?  This is a great question to ask yourself when selecting courses for next year.  My years on admission committees taught me that the high school transcript is the most influential component you will submit while applying to college.  So how can you choose classes that will give you the best possible foundation for college level work and improve your chances of admission?  Yale University has the answer.  

The article linked below is a great tool when considering class selection and the advice given is truly beneficial for students of all levels and accomplishments. While many of you have already completed your preliminary course selection there might still be opportunities to make changes.  As always, if you have any questions throughout the process, please contact me.  

Article below referenced from Yale University 

Many high school sophomores and juniors (and their parents) want to know what courses to take to improve their chances for admission to Yale and other highly competitive colleges. With the caveat that every situation is different, here is some advice to help guide you as you make these decisions.

A Holistic Approach to Admissions

The high school transcript is almost always the most important document in a student’s application. But it is hard to conceive of a situation in which the appearance (or absence) of any one particular class on a transcript would determine the applicant’s outcome. The admissions committee does not make its decisions based on a piecemeal review of an applicant’s recommendations, test scores, activities, or individual elements of a high school transcript. It considers each application as a comprehensive picture of that student.

Read more at Yale University >>

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