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Tagged: Applications

Admitted, denied or waitlisted

April 2nd, 2018

Did you hear a giant exhale last week?  The waiting game is over as most seniors received their remaining admission decisions; we’ve loved hearing from students about results.  Readers may be surprised to know that nearly all seniors saw each of these three words:  admitted, denied and wait-listed.  And that is as it should be.

The green light, yellow light, red light and lottery admission estimate system we have in place at Shrop Ed helps instill confidence that there will be good news as those decisions roll in.  As the number of applicants continues to rise, the number of rejections from colleges and universities increases as well.  This puts an extreme amount of pressure on students, and we hope that younger students and their parents understand the importance of creating an application list that includes plenty of green and yellow light options that feel like a fit.  Our seniors vouch for it.

Back to those three big words – here is some advice pertaining to each:

Admitted

Congratulations!  You can finally take a deep breath and enjoy the moment.  You now have until May 1st to notify the college of your choice that you will enroll.  Explore carefully between now and then to make sure you’re fully comfortable with your decision. 

Did you know that every admission offer is contingent on continued success?  Be certain to maintain your efforts in school, finishing strongly.  This not only insures a smooth transition to college in the fall, but keeps you on the right side of your admission offer.

Wait-listed

If this college remains your top choice, accept the offer and make clear that you are still interested by doing more.  Update your file, if the college allows, with your most recent grades, latest test scores (if not already on record), new accomplishments and distinctions, etc.  Remain proactive, reaching out to your admission counselor and demonstrating authentic interest.  If you would definitely enroll if admitted, state this unequivocally.

Denied

This is hard news to swallow, but it is a competitive world and the admission landscape has grown more challenging with each passing year.  Keep your head up and focus on the schools you were admitted to.  You are the same person today as you were before receiving the news; your strengths and potential to succeed are fully intact.

Not being accepted is difficult to handle, especially after putting your heart and soul into the college application process.    In the article we share with you today, writer Deirdre Fernandes from the Boston Globe digs a little deeper into the reality of disappointments surrounding U.S. colleges and universities.  

Article referenced below from Boston Globe

Published March 27, 2018

You’ve seen the viral videos: high school seniors leaping around the room, overjoyed at discovering that their top-choice college has welcomed them into the ranks of the incoming freshman class.

But for every victorious online posting, there are multiple high school seniors simultaneously being rejected from those very same schools.

Getting into the country’s most selective colleges is more fiercely competitive than ever, with many schools reporting a record number of applicants, boosted by an easier application process and more aggressive recruiting. Twenty years ago, for example, Tufts University admitted 33 percent of the students who applied; last year Tufts made offers to just 15 percent of the pool. Northeastern University extended offers to nearly four out of five applicants in 1998, but only one out of five this year. Williams College’s admissions rate has shrunk from 26 percent to 12 percent over two decades.

Read more at Boston Globe >>

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Juniors: open your eyes to scholarship opportunities

February 5th, 2018

Shrop Ed families know that despite urban myths, most scholarship assistance is offered by colleges directly.  Still, there are “external” scholarships for which students can apply, and their review processes are often highly competitive.

Most scholarship applications will be due in the fall, but there is one major scholarship deadline for juniors to pay attention to this spring:  that of the Bryan Cameron Education Foundation.  The Foundation limits the number of applications it will review for its Cameron Impact Scholarship and for that reason, it’s best to jump on the application well ahead of the posted May deadline.  The competition for these awards is daunting, as you’ll see when you read the statistics, yet we’re thrilled to have had two seniors in the Finalist round this year, one of whom was named a Cameron Impact Scholar!  Being a top student AND changing the world are important criteria for the award, and we’re thrilled to see intentional and excellent accomplishments recognized.

As we receive word of other major scholarship competitions, we’ll share information with the Shrop Ed community.  In the meantime, we urge all juniors interested in scholarship funding to set up an account on Cappex, which has a scholarship search engine that will match your profile to opportunities.

 

Read more at Bryan Cameron Education Foundation >>

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How to conquer the admissions essay

August 7th, 2017

We’ve shared several articles in the past weeks relating to essay questions, and many of our rising seniors have made good progress.  With the first day of school right around the corner, now’s the time to get serious about this part of your application if you haven’t yet done so.  In the article shared below, creative writer Rachel Toor gives great insight into what really goes on behind closed doors during admissions reviews.  

Toor gives specific examples of topics that work and some that don’t, with a great list of of things students should avoid.  The most significant piece of advice throughout this article is to make your essay personal and help the readers understand who you are through your writing.  

Many students have heard me reminisce about my years on admission committees at Tufts, Brandeis and Washington universities.  The best essays that I read during that time made me feel the student was right across the desk from me, ready to talk and answer questions.  Let your personality and voice shine through!

Article published below by New York Times

Picture this before you plop yourself down in front of your computer to compose your college application essay: A winter-lit room is crammed with admissions professionals and harried faculty members who sit around a big table covered with files. The admissions people, often young and underpaid, buzz with enthusiasm; the professors frequently pause to take off their glasses and rub their eyes.

These exhausted folks, hopped up from eating too many cookies and brownies, have been sitting in committee meetings for days after spending a couple of months reading applications, most of which look pretty similar: baseball = life, or debate = life, or “I went to a developing country and discovered poor people can be happy.”

Read more at New York Times >>

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Developing Personal Insight

July 24th, 2017

This week I want to share a link to a series of personal insight questions from the University of California’s college admission application.  I especially appreciate these questions for their scope and direction.  Whether you are applying to the UC system or not, you’ll find that the questions comprise a valuable exercise in shaping choices and reflection on what is important to you personally.  The personal insight questions are also beneficial for younger high school and middle school students and their parents to consider as they look ahead to searching for a boarding school and/or college.

Personal development is something we all continue to work on each day of our lives, whether we’re aware of it or not.  The series of questions provided by UC is a great way to get us to dig a little deeper and gain a better understanding of ourselves.

Intrigued?  Please read the article provided below.

Article published below by University of California’s Admissions website

What do you want UC to know about you? Here’s your chance to tell us in your own words.

Directions

  • You will have 8 questions to choose from. You must respond to only 4 of the 8 questions.
  • Each response is limited to a maximum of 350 words.
  • Which questions you choose to answer is entirely up to you: But you should select questions that are most relevant to your experience and that best reflect your individual circumstances.
Read more at University of California Admissions >>

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