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Tagged: Applications

Ring in the new year with kindness and communication

January 9th, 2019

January presents an opportunity for a fresh start and with the new year we often try to make changes that will create a better future.  College applicants are already considering how their new year will be different; graduating from high school, possibly moving away from home, and starting a new school will all come in 2019.  What if I told you that being mindful of communication and kindness could help smooth these transitions?  

In the article linked below, Forbes contributor Brennan Barnard has come up with ways to improve the college application process for everyone by adding communication and kindness.  It seems so simple, and as he explains how it can help each aspect of the admissions process you will appreciate why it is so important.  I hope this year brings you health, kindness and communication along with a great transition into this next phase of life.  

Article referenced below published on January 1, 2019 by Forbes, written by Brennan Barnard 

My family had a New Year’s tradition that was different than most, one that often led to tears and retribution between me and my brothers. At breakfast on January 1st every year, we gathered around pancakes, and instead of crafting our own New Year’s resolutions, the group would decide what each family member should commit to change or improve in the coming year. Having a spotlight on our shortcomings was no picnic, as you can imagine, but in retrospect, it was a valuable exercise.

College admission is an imperfect system. With each new year, it grows more complicated, and produces more anxiety and finger-pointing, for everyone involved. It’s easy enough to assign blame, but rarely are we willing to address our role. So, in the spirit of the Barnard family tradition, I want to suggest two simple New Year’s resolutions to all the constituents involved in college admission: communication and kindness. Imagine the ways that our culture could start to heal if we all stopped blaming each other, and instead of defaulting to extremes, embraced the ways we can contribute to a healthier global community. Whether you are a student, a parent, or a high school or college educator, this coming year I beg you to continually ask yourself, “what am I doing to be a better communicator and to be more kind?”

Read more at Forbes >>

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Completing applications over winter break? How to manage the stress

December 24th, 2018

Happy holidays and best wishes for 2019 to all!  As the month of December winds down, many students have already received admission decisions this month.  Congratulations to those who have been accepted Early Action or Early Decision!  I love hearing students’ news, no matter the outcome, so please continue to keep me in the loop as you receive admission decisions.

Winter break is here and while we hope you’re able to focus on family time and a little R&R, this hiatus is also perfect for students still wrapping up final applications for colleges and boarding schools.  Try to stay positive throughout this sometimes stressful process and remember to enjoy the time you have with friends and family.  The Wall Street Journal provides a wonderful article to help us remember to keep calm as deadlines are approaching.  (N.B. – although focused on college, portions of this article are also useful for students applying to boarding schools.) 

Parents, many of you have fully equipped students who are ready to make these important decisions and with this in mind, you might find this stressful time a little more enjoyable.

Article referenced below published on December 11, 2018 by The Wall Street Journal, written by Sue Shellenbarger 

It’s a monthslong ordeal that could change the course of a high school senior’s life, leading to a choice that could cost tens of thousands of dollars or more. No wonder the college-application season can torpedo the holidays for teens and their parents.

Many students labor to meet early-winter deadlines for college applications, often under the anxious eyes of their parents. The resulting stress can damage family relationships if parents fail to set good boundaries and keep their own anxieties in check.

Read more at Wall Street Journal >>

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How to handle Uncle Bob and Aunt Bertha during the holidays

November 27th, 2018

Navigating through holiday social events while keeping track of application deadlines, topped with interrogations by family members about your future plans, can be a bit overwhelming.  It’s a little bit like filling your plate with turkey, stuffing, vegetables and cranberry sauce and then trying to make room for the sweet potato casserole!

With Thanksgiving in the rearview mirror, now is a great time to reflect on conversations had with family and friends.  And with the winter holidays quickly approaching it is important to find balance while remaining productive, enjoying some time off while continuing to check things off your “to-do” list.  

The article we share below has many great tips and tricks to help guide you through the rest of the holiday season.  December is a month when many students will hear the outcome of Early Decision and Early Action applications and for seniors, waiting can often be the hardest part of this process.  Keeping busy and having a plan can help you through this time.  

Article referenced below published on November 14, 2018 by Counselors’ Corner, written by Patrick O’Connor.

Completing college applications can be hard work, work that often runs through the holiday season. Since everyone else is taking some time off, this would seem to be the perfect opportunity to hang out with your family, especially since this could be your last Thanksgiving/New Year/Kwanzmasakah as a full-time occupant of your parents’ home. How could this possibly be a bad idea?
“My friend,” says you, “you clearly don’t know my parents, or my Uncle Bob.”
And yet, I actually do. Here are the three keys to thriving (not just surviving) this holiday season:
Read more at Counselor's Corner >>

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Does your social media presence help you or harm you?

October 2nd, 2018

Social media is a powerful platform and while it can be a great tool for networking, the disciplinary consequence of posting something inappropriate could be detrimental to your school or college admission prospects.  Some colleges are using your social media “brand” as fair game when evaluating you for admission; perhaps boarding schools are doing the same.  For that reason, application season is a great time to review your online presence.  Consider your profile as a way to show the world your best self, beyond your test scores and grades. 

In the article referenced below, Thao Nelson, a lecturer at Indiana University, writes an open letter to students discussing the importance of taking your future self into consideration when posting on social media.  Colleges and schools want to enroll people who strengthen their student body, so “when in doubt, leave it out” is a great motto to consider before liking or posting online.

Article referenced below published by World Economic Forum, written by Thao Nelson

Dear Student,

Harvard recently rescinded admission offers for some incoming freshmen who participated in a private Facebook group sharing offensive memes. The incident has sparked a lot of discussion: Was Harvard’s decision justified? What about the First Amendment? Do young people know the dangers of social media?

I’m a business school lecturer, career services counselor and former recruiter, and I’ve seen how social media becomes part of a person’s brand – a brand that can help you or hurt you.

Read more at World Economic Forum >>

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