Student Login

Tagged: Admission decision

Does your social media presence help you or harm you?

October 2nd, 2018

Social media is a powerful platform and while it can be a great tool for networking, the disciplinary consequence of posting something inappropriate could be detrimental to your school or college admission prospects.  Some colleges are using your social media “brand” as fair game when evaluating you for admission; perhaps boarding schools are doing the same.  For that reason, application season is a great time to review your online presence.  Consider your profile as a way to show the world your best self, beyond your test scores and grades. 

In the article referenced below, Thao Nelson, a lecturer at Indiana University, writes an open letter to students discussing the importance of taking your future self into consideration when posting on social media.  Colleges and schools want to enroll people who strengthen their student body, so “when in doubt, leave it out” is a great motto to consider before liking or posting online.

Article referenced below published by World Economic Forum, written by Thao Nelson

Dear Student,

Harvard recently rescinded admission offers for some incoming freshmen who participated in a private Facebook group sharing offensive memes. The incident has sparked a lot of discussion: Was Harvard’s decision justified? What about the First Amendment? Do young people know the dangers of social media?

I’m a business school lecturer, career services counselor and former recruiter, and I’ve seen how social media becomes part of a person’s brand – a brand that can help you or hurt you.

Read more at World Economic Forum >>

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Demonstrated interest: what’s it all about?

September 4th, 2018

Have you ever had to choose someone to help you with a project or become a member of your team, and found yourself leaning towards the person who shows more interest and dedication to the task?

Many colleges act the same way. 

Assessing a student’s “demonstrated interest” has become one of the best ways to gauge an applicant’s likelihood of enrolling if admitted.  We’ve discussed the importance of demonstrated interest in the past and we continue to encourage students to develop connections with admission counselors at colleges they’re considering seriously.  

Demonstrated interest comes in many forms and is not restricted to campus visits.  Web chats, information requests, even sending official test score reports can signal your interest to a college.

Many schools are looking for students to initiate contact with their admissions office.  Seniors can demonstrate interest in the coming weeks by meeting with visiting college admission representatives in their schools and at locally-held gatherings, or emailing the admissions office to find out if and when they will be in the area.  Juniors can do the same.

It’s important to note that not all colleges use demonstrated interest as a factor in admission decisions.  Colleges offering admission to only a single-digit proportion of applicants, for example, do not generally encourage such contact.  However, if a school strongly encourages campus visits or offers campus interviews, your level of interest will probably be taken into consideration.  As always, it is important to be genuine in your communication with admission staff and be yourself.  

Here’s a great article to tell you more.

Article referenced below published on May 21, 2018 by US News, written by Kelly Mae Ross

In addition to reviewing transcripts, essays and test scores, some college admissions officers look at whether prospective students have shown enthusiasm and curiosity about a school during the application process.

In the admissions world, this is what’s known as demonstrated interest.

In a 2017 report from the National Association for College Admission Counseling, 13.7 percent of colleges surveyed rated demonstrated interest as having considerable importance in freshman admissions decisions. Another 25.5 percent said it was of moderate importance.

 

Read more at US News >>

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Are test-optional colleges more diverse?

May 14th, 2018

As more colleges eliminate standardized tests from their admission requirements, the long-standing debate about whether test-optional schools provide more diversity on campus is still going strong.  Studies have documented a correlation between family income and test performance.  The higher the income, the more opportunities for test prep classes, which in turn increase scores.  This typically leaves low income families, including many minority students, at a disadvantage.  

Our experience shows that test scores do not always reflect a student’s strengths and abilities and we have a great appreciation for colleges that are test-optional, interested in understanding all facets of an applicant.

One significant question remains to be answered: does a test-optional admission policy really diversify a college campus?  In today’s article from Inside Higher Ed, writer Scott Jaschik lays out all the evidence.  After reviewing this article, what are your thoughts? 

For a full list of schools that have a test-optional or flexible test policy, please visit www.fairtest.org.

Article referenced below published April 27, 2018 by Inside HigherEd

Each year, more colleges announce that they are ending requirements that applicants submit SAT and ACT scores — joining hundreds of others in the “test-optional” camp. Just this week, Augsburg University in Minnesota made such a shift. The university’s announcement said that the policy had strong faculty support and was seen as likely to boost the diversity of the student body. High school grades in college preparatory courses are the key to good admissions decisions, said officials there, just as their peers have said at many other institutions.

Read more at Inside HigherEd >>

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Social media is fair game

April 30th, 2018

In this digital age we live in, many high school students document much of their lives through social media.  And with increasing competition amongst college applicants, many admissions officers are using social media as an additional tool for screening candidates.  This approach is a fast, easy and anonymous way to gain insight into students’ lives.  But will it weigh in your favor?

Keep in mind that your social media presence can add value to your application; it could be used as a way to highlight talents and experiences and leave a positive impression.  If you’re not careful, though, it could have the opposite effect.

While admissions officers are continuing to place greatest emphasis on traditional components of the application such as transcript, test scores and extracurricular accomplishments, there is a chance that they may look to your social media accounts as another means of evaluation.  This trend has increased over the past several years and will probably continue to move in that direction.  

In the article we share with you today from Kaplan Test Prep, you can learn more about why many admissions officers are choosing this form of assessment.

Article referenced below from Kaplan Test Prep

Published on April 17, 2018

More than two-thirds of colleges (68 percent) say that it’s “fair game” for them to visit applicants’ social media profiles like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to help them decide who gets in — despite the fact that less than a third actually engage in the practice, according to Kaplan Test Prep’s annual survey of admissions officers*. Notably, students agree: a separate Kaplan survey of over 900 high school students finds that 70 percent consider social media profiles “fair game” for admissions officers evaluating applicants — an increase from 58 percent in 2014**.

Read more at Kaplan Test Prep >>

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