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Tagged: Admission decision

National College Decision Day is almost here! Seniors, are you ready?

April 2nd, 2019

Seniors know that May 1st is designated as National College Decision Day: the deadline to submit an enrollment deposit to attend the university of one’s choice.  That’s right – after a long and thorough search process, seniors are down to roughly four weeks remaining to decide where they’ll spend the next four years of their lives. This is a very exciting time, yet it can also be stressful because there is a lot to consider.

In the article linked below from Forbes.com, the author, who is also a professor, lists four important things to consider when choosing a college.  Whether you are just beginning or a senior in the final phase of the college search, I hope today’s article will help you focus further on what is truly important to you in a school.

I look forward to hearing from seniors about choices very soon.

Article linked below from Forbes.com, published on February 19, 2016, by Chad Orzel

Four Important Things To Consider When Choosing A College

The college admissions process goes year-round these days, but the activity and the associated stress level peaks twice a year: once in the fall, when high-school students have to decide what schools they want to apply to, and again in late winter/early spring when those same students are forced to make a decision about what college to attend. The process and the pressure on students has intensified considerably since my high-school days back in the 1980’s (after the dinosaurs but before the giant armored sloths), and as a faculty member, I’ve talked to dozens of students (and parents) over the years who are going through the process, many of them teetering on the edge of panic.

Having gone through this a lot– this is my fifteenth year as a professor– I have a well-worn set of advice I give to anxious high-school seniors on campus visits. Having previously offered a bunch of academic advice in blog form– why small colleges are great for students planning to study science, what students should do to prepare for studying science in college, why non-science students need to take science, and why science students need to take non-science classes— I might as well offer some general advice on the choice of college.

Read more at Forbes >>

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Admission decisions: What to do when you are wait-listed

March 19th, 2019

The Ides of March, notorious for the demise of Julius Caesar, will now also be remembered for the unveiling of one of the most stupendous college admission scams of all time.  Many clients were in touch over the last week, sharing gratitude for collaboration that highlights ethical conduct and the life lesson that such work together provides students.  My heartfelt thanks go to each of you who took time to reach out.

The Ides of March also herald the final round of admission decisions.  Colleges are releasing Regular Decision results and by April 1 all decisions should be on the table.  While I hope there will be much cause for jubilation, this year has been inordinately competitive, and many students across the nation are receiving at least some disappointing news.  Please continue to keep me posted on what you’re hearing and thinking.

Today’s article link will help you know how to handle the most mystifying of colleges’ decisions:  the wait-list offer.  If you’ve been wait-listed by colleges that interest you, please take time to digest the article, take a deep breath and, whatever the ultimate admission outcomes, congratulate yourself for having put your best effort into the process. 

The strengths that each of you will bring to college are impressive, and an admission disappointment will not render them any less so.  Onward and upward!  My best wishes are with each student as admission decisions roll in.

Article referenced below on April 13, 2017 from US News, written by Jordan Friedman

BEING WAIT-LISTED FROM college can be disappointing for high schoolers applying to their dream schools.

Camila Alvarez was devastated when she was wait-listed by her first choice, George Washington University, last spring. She knew that for wait-listed applicants at many schools, the odds of getting in are slim.

But even after accepting her spot on the waitlist and submitting a deposit elsewhere, Alvarez didn’t give up. She updated the admissions office about her improved GPA and new leadership roles in clubs, and also had a phone interview. To her surprise, she got in by early June, says the current freshman.

The 91 ranked colleges that reported these data to U.S. News in an annual survey admitted anywhere from zero to 100 percent of wait-listed applicants. But the average was about 1 in 5, the data show.

Read more at US News >>

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How to handle Uncle Bob and Aunt Bertha during the holidays

November 27th, 2018

Navigating through holiday social events while keeping track of application deadlines, topped with interrogations by family members about your future plans, can be a bit overwhelming.  It’s a little bit like filling your plate with turkey, stuffing, vegetables and cranberry sauce and then trying to make room for the sweet potato casserole!

With Thanksgiving in the rearview mirror, now is a great time to reflect on conversations had with family and friends.  And with the winter holidays quickly approaching it is important to find balance while remaining productive, enjoying some time off while continuing to check things off your “to-do” list.  

The article we share below has many great tips and tricks to help guide you through the rest of the holiday season.  December is a month when many students will hear the outcome of Early Decision and Early Action applications and for seniors, waiting can often be the hardest part of this process.  Keeping busy and having a plan can help you through this time.  

Article referenced below published on November 14, 2018 by Counselors’ Corner, written by Patrick O’Connor.

Completing college applications can be hard work, work that often runs through the holiday season. Since everyone else is taking some time off, this would seem to be the perfect opportunity to hang out with your family, especially since this could be your last Thanksgiving/New Year/Kwanzmasakah as a full-time occupant of your parents’ home. How could this possibly be a bad idea?
“My friend,” says you, “you clearly don’t know my parents, or my Uncle Bob.”
And yet, I actually do. Here are the three keys to thriving (not just surviving) this holiday season:
Read more at Counselor's Corner >>

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Does your social media presence help you or harm you?

October 2nd, 2018

Social media is a powerful platform and while it can be a great tool for networking, the disciplinary consequence of posting something inappropriate could be detrimental to your school or college admission prospects.  Some colleges are using your social media “brand” as fair game when evaluating you for admission; perhaps boarding schools are doing the same.  For that reason, application season is a great time to review your online presence.  Consider your profile as a way to show the world your best self, beyond your test scores and grades. 

In the article referenced below, Thao Nelson, a lecturer at Indiana University, writes an open letter to students discussing the importance of taking your future self into consideration when posting on social media.  Colleges and schools want to enroll people who strengthen their student body, so “when in doubt, leave it out” is a great motto to consider before liking or posting online.

Article referenced below published by World Economic Forum, written by Thao Nelson

Dear Student,

Harvard recently rescinded admission offers for some incoming freshmen who participated in a private Facebook group sharing offensive memes. The incident has sparked a lot of discussion: Was Harvard’s decision justified? What about the First Amendment? Do young people know the dangers of social media?

I’m a business school lecturer, career services counselor and former recruiter, and I’ve seen how social media becomes part of a person’s brand – a brand that can help you or hurt you.

Read more at World Economic Forum >>

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